Want to learn more about COVID-19? Join in on tonight’s Community Conversation in our Virtual Community Room.

Want to learn more about COVID-19? Join in on tonight’s Community Conversation in our Virtual Community Room.

Join Council Member Kelly Krell and local public health expert Rebecca McMeekan Heick in the City of Riverdale’s Online Community Room on Thursday, May 14 at 7 pm for a discussion on COVID-19 facts vs. fiction and local status update.
 
Dr. Heick is an epidemiologist and full-time faculty member at Augustana College, and this is sure to be an insightful and entertaining opportunity to have your questions answered and learn more about what’s going on in our community.
 

Just click here to go to our Online Community Room

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3212

Access Code: 569-793-517

New to GoToMeeting? Get the app now and be ready when your first meeting starts:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/install/569793517


Not able to attend our community conversation? Don’t worry, an edited video recording of the session held on May 14 can be found below. And remember, many of the tips offered by our guest are still valid and worth keeping in mind today.

Mayor proposes guidelines for opening playgrounds and public gathering places

Mayor proposes guidelines for opening playgrounds and public gathering places

Mayor Mike Bawden has prepared a draft of guidelines for re-opening the City’s playgrounds and public gathering places like the Council Chambers and Community Room at City Hall. These guidelines take into consideration public health concerns related to the COVID-19 outbreak and, if passed, will go into effect on June 1, 2020.

 

Parks and Playgrounds

The guidelines allow for visitors to use the parks from sunrise to sunset, but requires individuals or family units (those people living in the same household) to maintain at least a distance of six feet between groups. Picnicking and sunbathing in the parks will be permitted (as of June 1), but only if proper social distancing protocols are followed. Masks are not required but are encouraged.

Other rules related to the parks – specifically anti-littering provisions and no open flames – remain in effect. If park visitors want to use an on-site structure (e.g. the gazebo in Volunteer Park or the shelters in Peggy’s Park or Bicentennial Park), they may do so, but there are additional guidelines that must be followed and the facilities must be reserved at City Hall prior to their use.

With specific regard to playgrounds, the mayor’s proposal includes the use of PLAYGROUND GUIDES to help supervise the activities during restricted hours (10 am to 5:30 pm). Children (and their siblings or adult supervisors) are asked to take turns using equipment so only one child is on a piece of equipment at a time. Everyone using playground equipment is required to wear a mask or cloth face covering. If they don’t have one, the mayor proposes the City provide a face covering that can be returned (for cleaning) after use.

When the playgrounds close, the PLAYGROUND GUIDES will be tasked with disinfecting and wiping down the equipment to prepare it for the next day.

The parks and playground guidelines are intended to run through August 15 but may be extended if deemed necessary by the mayor.

 

Public Gathering Spots

The mayor has also provided proposed guidelines to re-open the outdoor and indoor gathering spots in the City’s parks and at City Hall. These guidelines would go into effect on June 1, as well, and remain in effect until modified.

In general, the modified guidelines require people who want to use any of the public gathering spots to notify City staff at City Hall and obtain a permit. There is no cost for getting an occupancy permit for the gazebo or park shelters, but the City is asking residents to reserve no more than four hours at a time to allow other residents to enjoy the amenities at their leisure, as well. The permitting process also provides an opportunity for staff to review the guidelines for use with the resident and to answer any questions that may arise.

For the outdoor facilities, residents and their groups can meet at the location although the number of people allowed under the roof at one time is limited to reflect preferred social distance practices. Face coverings are highly recommended, but not required.

Outdoor gathering spots close when the parks close, at sunset, although accommodations can be made but may be subject to a fee and will be handled on a case-by-case basis (subject to mayoral or administrative approval).

As for the gathering spots at City Hall – most notably the Community Room, but also the Council Chambers – use is limited to one gathering per room per day, with strict attendance limitations. This is to allow time for staff to clean and disinfect the facilities between uses. Reservations will be posted to the calendar on the City’s website so individuals interested in reserving one room or the other will know what days are free.

We need a hand to open our playgrounds this summer …

We need a hand to open our playgrounds this summer …

“We’re in this together.”

Does that sound familiar? It should. It’s the catch-phrase that so many organizations, businesses and public officials are using as a rallying cry to the American public as we deal with the widespread, public health and economic crisis.

As a guy who creates slogans and catch-phrases for a living, I can tell you that the best of them are the ones that appeal to your common sense. They just sound true when they are said. And you are able to see yourself “Just Doing It” or “Doing Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.”

And, yes, I just called “The Golden Rule” a catch-phrase. That King James had some pretty great copywriters on his staff.

“We’re In This Together” reminds us that by working together, we (all of humanity, really, since this is a pandemic we’re talking about) can accomplish amazing things. That idea holds up on all different levels. Even when you break it down to a small city the size of Riverdale. 

Especially when we’re talking about our smallest residents.

 

Riverdale Needs Your Help

As you may have noticed, I’ve proposed to the City Council that we take some extra precautions when we try to re-open our playgrounds and community gathering spots in June. These precautions are intended to help keep the most vulnerable among us safe from the unintended spread of the coronavirus.

“Social spread” of the coronavirus is a particularly difficult problem. It’s been shown that people can infect others before they even show any symptoms of the illness. This is of particular concern with children – who may have and spread the virus and never show signs of contracting it.

As a result, schools, parks and playgrounds were closed during the public health emergency declarations and now cities and states are trying to figure out the best way to re-open them and not create a surge in COVID-19 infections as an unintended consequence. A big part of the problem, though, is that many of the “customers” of our parks and playgrounds are too young to understand or practice effective distancing measures without a little encouragement and reinforcement.

That’s why the Riverdale plan for re-opening our playgrounds includes the introduction of PLAYGROUND GUIDES. Just like public swimming pools employ lifeguards to provide instruction and ensure safety, I envision Riverdale’s PLAYGROUND GUIDES doing much the same thing in our playgrounds in Bicentennial Park and Peggy’s Park.

While it would be nice to have volunteers provide this service, I think we have to be realistic and not expect that to actually happen – at least not all the time. For that reason, I’ve asked the Council to authorize up to $10,000 in expenses this summer to cover the cost of part-time wages and provide supplies and materials to our PLAYGROUND GUIDES (whether they’re paid or volunteers) so proper oversight and instruction can occur at our playgrounds.

Please take a look at the proposed guidelines here and participate in our discussion at City Hall at Tuesday’s Council Meeting – when the Council considers authorizing both the guidelines and the supplemental budget expenditure for the guides program this summer. 

“Meals-to-Go” program expanded to include those without a job due to COVID-19.

“Meals-to-Go” program expanded to include those without a job due to COVID-19.

At its regular meeting on May 12, the Riverdale City Council passed a resolution expanding the current “Meals-to-Go” program to include individuals who have lost their job, either temporarily or permanently, due to the COVID-19 outbreak. This expands the program from its initial scope which focused on seniors and low-to-moderate income households.

“We’ve had about a dozen people take advantage of the program so far,” said Mayor Mike Bawden. “The word is spreading slowly, which is fine, because it gives us time to work out any kinks in the system with the folks at The Pancake House.”

The grant will cover the cost of meals and delivery for up to 500 meals through April 24, 2021.

Meals can be ordered via the City’s website (by using the form, below) from The Duck Creek Pancake House who will prepare the meals and deliver them to Riverdale residents between 11:30 and 1:30.

Residents can also call City Hall during regular work hours (Mon – Fri, from 8am – 5pm) to place orders for the coming week.

Meals will not be prepared and served on Sundays or Holidays. 


Selected Value: 1

Riverdale’s playgrounds and community room will remain closed through May.

Riverdale’s playgrounds and community room will remain closed through May.

I’ve just posted this to the bulletin boards in Riverdale. Please take a moment to read it …

One month ago, I decided to extend the shutdown of the parks, playgrounds, and community room for the City of Riverdale through today, May 15, 2020. At that time, I said that the shutdown would be extended if, in my opinion, the health and well-being of the community could be adversely affected by the unintended spread of COVID-19 should groups of citizens gather at a public meeting spot.

I’m sorry to say that even though some cities and counties in Iowa have chosen to re-open parks and community spaces, neither the state nor Scott County have seen a decline in COVID-19 cases for 14 days in a row (in fact, cases in Scott County are rising slowly) and as a result, I’ve decided to continue keeping the City’s playgrounds and community room closed to the public.  I will re-visit this decision again at the end of the Month (May 31st) and will update the public via email, our website and public postings.

Recognizing the need for our residents to move and get out of the house, however, I am authorizing the use of city parks and trails for hiking, dog-walking and similar activities as long as residents maintain a minimum of six feet of distance between groups (hiking with your family members as a group is fine). Please do not linger in places. Keep moving and keep your distance.

In the meantime, I will be working with residents and members of the City Council to come up with guidelines that will allow the limited use of our playgrounds and community room. I hope to present these guidelines at our next City Council Meeting on May 26th.

It’s my hope these guidelines will limit the possibility of viral spread between people in our public spaces – but will allow residents to enjoy the benefits of friendship and fellowship with their neighbors.

Please continue to follow developments of this and other Riverdale-related news on our website: www.riverdaleiowa.com and through our weekly e-newsletter.

Stay safe and healthy – we’ll be seeing you soon!

Will Riverdale’s playgrounds open soon? Not yet, but there is hope!

Will Riverdale’s playgrounds open soon? Not yet, but there is hope!

So, I’ve been asked about whether or not Riverdale will be re-opening our Community Room and Parks/Playgrounds on Friday. The short answer is “no” but there’s a more in-depth explanation I’d like to share with all of you (I posted this on the Riverdale Residents page just a few minutes ago) …
 
“I’ve asked a select group of citizens known as “The Playground Users’ Group” (all kids between 5th and 10th grade) to create a set of guidelines they can live by that will explain how they’ll socially distance, what kinds of games they’ll be playing and how they’ll educate and encourage other kids at the playground to play safe.
 
If they can come up with the guidelines, I’ll review them and we’ll figure out a plan to re-open the playgrounds and parks. Right now, though, I’m going to temporarily extend our shut downs to the end of the month and start working on guidelines for limited (and safe) use of the Community Room, Gazebo and Park Shelters while my 10-15 year-old colleagues work on the playground rules.”
 
I’m quite concerned that removing the restrictions on our public places will seemingly minimize the threat posed by COVID-19 that still exists today as much (or more) than it did a month or two ago when we enacted the restrictions in the first place. By the same token, I know that it will become increasingly difficult for people to stay sheltered in place for even more weeks – especially if there’s no end in sight.
 
I believe there’s a third option and that requires a combination of discipline and ingenuity.
 
What I’ve asked our “Playground Users’ Group” to do is give me guidelines they think they can live within. This is important – especially with kids – because while many kids may never contract COVID-19 this year, they can spread it from one kid to another (at the playground) and carry the virus back into the home where it could infect an at-risk adult or senior member of the family. By giving these youngsters an opportunity to become part of the “solution” to the problem, we not only give them the possibility of playing outside again (responsibly), but we teach them that they can work with local government to make things happen that are important to them.
 
Call it a 2-fer-1 education in social and biological sciences. A teachable moment. Or, for some parents, a chance to finally get the kids out from in front of the TV.
 
I’ll let you know how things go.
Riverdale receives state grant to fund local meal program during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Riverdale receives state grant to fund local meal program during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Friday afternoon, the City of Riverdale was notified by the Iowa Economic Development Authority, that it had received a state grant to pay for a meal program designed to deliver freshly-cooked meals to local seniors and low-to-moderate income households during the COVID-19 pandemic. Meals will be prepared and delivered by the Duck Creek Pancake House to residents of Riverdale who sign up.

Details to be Worked Out on Monday

The Mayor will be meeting with the owners of the Duck Creek Pancake House to work through the details of the program, but prior to the application made by the City, both had agreed that the business would charge a flat rate of $15 per meal to include delivery charges. The meals are to be complete, nutritious lunches and delivered promptly to residences in Riverdale so the meals can be served hot.

Residents who are 65 years or older may receive the free meals and occupants in households earning $58,000 per year or less are also eligible.

The grant received from the State of Iowa will cover up to 500 meals.

A copy of the grant application letter can be viewed here. More details on the program will be published on the City’s website and communicated via social media later this week.

The Mayor expects the program to officially kick off on May 1.

Parks and Community Room remain closed for the month of April

Parks and Community Room remain closed for the month of April

Based on conversations with state and local public health officials and out of an abundance of caution related to the current COVID-19 outbreak, Mayor Mike Bawden has extended the shut down of the city’s community room at City Hall and closed Riverdale’s parks to general public access for the month of April.

“I hate to say it, but it looks like things will be getting worse before they get better and we need to do what we can to encourage people to keep their distance and stay home for the next 4-8 weeks,” he said. Citing reports that people can unintentionally spread COVID-19 while being asymptomatic (not showing any signs of illness) for up to 5 days, the mayor felt it was appropriate to take these measures as part of the over-all “social distancing” policy encouraged by the CDC.

In addition to closing the parks and continuing the suspension of activities in the community room, the mayor also ordered all public meetings scheduled for April to be conducted online via the City’s GoToMeeting account. There are two regular meetings of the City Council on the schedule (April 14 and April 28) and a town hall meeting (April 26) for the month.

“We need to do what we can to encourage people to stay inside, stay safe and stay healthy,” said the mayor.

Bulky waste and yard waste pickups suspended due to COVID-19

Bulky waste and yard waste pickups suspended due to COVID-19

The City was notified by Republic Services that due to the COVID-19 pandemic, they were changing the nature of the services they were providing to cities (Riverdale among them) for the foreseeable future.

Specifically, Republic explained they will continue to collect waste from households and businesses, but that they would suspend bulky waste and yard waste pick-ups.

According to Matt Pivit (the Municipal Services Manager from Republic), if your waste material can not fit in your garbage cart, they will not take it. This is to assure that workers are not touching waste. Carts (for both garbage and recycling) are picked up using a robotic arm on the side of the truck collecting material.

Services are expected to resume once the COVID-19 situation is in-hand.

What Will We Do?

Believe it or not, we were working on this problem before the Friday night storm that filled many Riverdale basements with rainwater. What we initially thought would be just a yard waste problem is now something much more substantial and we’re taking this matter very seriously.

Yard Waste. We will be confirming with the Compost Facility that we can bring yard waste to the facility for the foreseeable future. I will also be discussing this with Republic to see if we can reduce the fees we pay them to cover the cost of dropping material off for composting. Assuming this can all be worked out in an agreeable manner, we will advise residents on how we can all work together to dispose of our yard waste during the spring using volunteers, city vehicles and proper social distancing.

For seniors unable to haul/move bags of yard waste, please be patient. Let us know and we’ll work on a solution. 

Bulky Waste. We will be contacting Republic on Monday to see if we can line up two roll-off dumpsters for residents who have bulky waste that they need to remove from their home immediately. This means ruined household items as a result of Friday’s storms. It’s important folks can get this material out of their houses and let their basements dry out so mold doesn’t develop.

If there’s room left in the dumpsters, then we’ll keep them around for another week so people can toss in their other bulky waste. When the dumpsters are full, we’ll have Republic haul them away and take the material to the landfill.

Community Clean-Up. So what are we going to do about our traditional “Community Clean-Up”? It’s likely we’ll still have some kind of clean-up activity later on this year – but it will probably be more focused on picking up litter and roadside waste moreso than household, bulky waste. The City will contact the Waste Commission of Scott County to see if there’s a way we can get plenty of iLiveHere garbage bags, tongs and other tools for households who want to get outside and do something to make Riverdale look even better than usual.

Let us know if you’ve got the “anti-litter” bug and we’ll help get you equipped!

Mental health services are just a phone call away.

Mental health services are just a phone call away.

With the constant crush of news about pandemic, floods, tornados, recession and more, it’s easy to see how people can feel overwhelmed. Anxiety and associated problems can lead to mental health issues that, if not handled directly and discreetly, could spin out of control.

In Scott County, we’re fortunate to be part of the Eastern Iowa Mental Health and Disability Services Region. They operate a toll-free, crisis “hot line” which provides trained, compassionate telephone counseling, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. That phone number is: 844-430-0375.

And if you’re just in need of someone to talk to, they also operate a non-crisis “warm line” which provides confidential listening for anyone between the hours of 5pm and 10pm daily. That phone number is: 844-775-9276.

What Constitutes a Crisis?

Wondering if your crisis is bad enough to warrant a call? EIMHDS provides some guidelines for you to consider. A crisis can result from any major loss – the death of a loved one, a divorce, depression or anxiety. Symptoms of a crisis include:

•  Eating or sleeping too much or too little.
•   Fighting with family and friends.
•  Thinking of hurting or harming yourself or someone else.

For more on mental health services accessible by contacting the Scott County Community Services Department:

Lori Elam
Director
Community Services
Scott County Administrative Center
600 W. 4th St.
Davenport, IA 52801-1030
phone: 563-326-8723
fax: 563-326-8730
email: commserve@scottcountyiowa.com

April egg hunt postponed due to COVID-19 concerns

April egg hunt postponed due to COVID-19 concerns

At it’s last meeting (held on March 24), the Riverdale City Council passed a resolution authorizing Council Member Kelly Krell to re-schedule the annual egg hunt, planned for April 4, to a later date. This decision did not come as a surprise.

The resolution allows Council Member Krell to cancel existing contracts for the April 4 event and re-negotiate agreements with vendors for other events currently on the Community Engagement calendar for remainder of the calendar year. Whether the egg hunt activity becomes part of another event (like the Ice Cream Social scheduled for June) or remains a stand-alone activity to be held later this year, remains to be seen.

Please keep an eye on the City’s website and social media for more updates.

Governor Reynolds declares public health disaster. More closures result.

Governor Reynolds declares public health disaster. More closures result.

from the office of the Governor of the State of Iowa

Governor Kim Reynolds issued a State of Public Health Disaster Emergency activating the public health response and recovery aspects of the State Disaster Emergency Plan effective at noon today. 

It takes significant steps to require social distancing and limit community spread of the virus by implementing temporary measures including moving restaurants to drive-through, carry-out, and delivery only and closures of certain entities such as bars and recreational facilities. The proclamation also allows state agencies additional flexibility in responding to the unprecedented COVID-19 situation, and supports the critical work of public health. 

“These are unprecedented times and the state of Iowa will do whatever is necessary to address this public health disaster. I have authorized all available state resources, supplies, equipment and materials to combat the spread of COVID-19,” said Gov. Reynolds. “The actions taken today are necessary to protect the health and safety of all Iowans and are critical to mitigating the spread of the virus.”

Read the full text of the proclamation below:

WHEREAS, the World Health Organization has reported an outbreak of thousands of cases of Novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in multiple countries, causing illness and deaths; and

WHEREAS, on January 31, 2020, the United States Department of Health and Human Services declared a national public health emergency; and

WHEREAS, on March 9, 2020, a Proclamation of Disaster Emergency was issued to coordinate the State of Iowa’s response to this outbreak and such disaster continues to exist; and

WHEREAS, on March 11, 2020 the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a global pandemic; and

WHEREAS, on March 13, 2020, President Donald J. Trump issued a proclamation declaring that the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States constitutes a national emergency; and

WHEREAS, multiple cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in Iowa, and the Iowa Department of Public Health has determined that community spread of COVID-19 is occurring within our state; and

WHEREAS, reports forwarded by local public health officials and state public health officials indicate that local resources and capacities are being exhausted and state assistance and resources are necessary to respond to and recover from the effects of this public health disaster; and

WHEREAS, local jurisdictions may not have sufficient personnel and other resources to effectively conduct epidemiologic investigations of infectious disease outbreaks, provide medical care, and respond to health threats; and

WHEREAS, COVID-19 can spread person-to-person and poses a possibility of causing severe illness in certain populations and disability and/or death to certain Iowans.  Likewise, reports forwarded by federal, state, and local officials indicate that state assistance is needed to manage and contain this outbreak; and

WHEREAS, the risk of transmission of COVID-19 may be substantially reduced by separating and restricting the movement of persons known or suspected to have the disease, or who have been exposed to those known or suspected to have the disease; and 

WHEREAS, the risk of transmission of COVID-19 may be substantially reduced by community containment strategies that may include temporarily closing schools in affected communities and other public venues; and

WHEREAS, strict compliance with the provision of the Iowa Code and Iowa Administrative Code requiring a certificate of need prior to an institutional health facility operating additional bed capacity will also prevent or hinder efforts to contain this public health disaster.

WHEREAS, strict compliance with the provisions of Iowa law which establish preconditions or which would otherwise limit or restrict the provision of telehealth or telemedicine services and those which require face-to-face interactions with health care providers and requirements for residential and outpatient treatment and face-to-face visitations, would prevent, hinder, or delay necessary action in coping with this disaster in all counties of our state. 

WHEREAS, strict compliance with the provisions of Iowa law which prohibit the practice of medicine and surgery, osteopathic medicine and surgery, nursing, respiratory care, and practice as a physician assistant, with an inactive or lapsed license would prevent, hinder, or delay necessary action in coping with this disaster in all counties of our state.

WHEREAS, strict compliance with the provisions of Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 256.16(1)(a)(2)(d) and (m) and Iowa Admin. Code rules 281-77.10 (9), 281-79.14(5), and 281-79.14(7) that require a minimum number of hours of field experience in a practitioner preparation program provided by a higher education institution would prevent, hinder, or delay necessary action in coping with this disaster in all counties of our state.

WHEREAS, strict compliance with the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code §§ 321.174A, 321.196, 321.39, 321.46, 321.25 regarding driver’s license, title, and vehicle registration requirements would prevent, hinder, or delay necessary action in coping with this disaster in all counties of our state.

WHEREAS, strict compliance with the permit and fee requirements of Iowa Code § 321E.29 and Iowa Admin. Code chapter 761-511 allowing oversize and overweight divisible loads under certain circumstances will prevent or hinder efforts to cope with this disaster in all counties of our state.

WHEREAS, strict compliance with the requirements of Iowa Code § 455C.3 (1) and Iowa Admin. Code chapter 567-107 that such dealers must accept empty beverage containers on which an Iowa deposit was made will prevent or hinder efforts to cope with this disaster in all counties of our state.

NOW THEREFORE, I, KIMBERLY K. REYNOLDS, Governor of the State of Iowa, by the power and authority vested in me by the Iowa Constitution, Art. IV, §§ 1, 8 and Iowa Code §§ 29C.6(1), 135.140(6), and 135.144 do hereby proclaim a STATE OF PUBLIC HEALTH DISASTER EMERGENCY throughout the entire state of Iowa and do hereby ORDER and DIRECT the following:

SECTION ONE.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (1) and (10), I hereby activate the public health response and recovery aspects of the state disaster emergency plan applicable to this public health disaster and authorize the use and deployment of all available state resources, supplies, equipment, and materials as are reasonably necessary pursuant to those plans to assist those citizens located in the counties subject to this proclamation. 

SECTION TWO.  I hereby direct the Iowa Department of Public Health, in conjunction with whatever further direction I provide, to take those reasonable and necessary actions authorized by Iowa Code § 135.144 to address this public health disaster, including but not limited to mobilizing as many public health response teams as are necessary to supplement and support disrupted or overburdened local medical and public health personnel, hospitals, and resources, as allowed by Iowa Code § 135.143 and 641 Iowa Admin. Code 113.2 (1), with the understanding that the registered members of those public health response teams providing assistance under this authority shall receive the protections and benefits of state employees as allowed by law.   

SECTION THREE.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 135.144 (3), and in conjunction with the Iowa Department of Public Health, unless otherwise modified by subsequent proclamation or order of the Iowa Department of Public Health, I hereby order that effective Noon today, March 17, 2020, and continuing until 11:59 p.m. on March 31, 2020:

A.   Restaurants and Bars: All Restaurants and Bars are hereby closed to the general public except that to the extent permitted by applicable law, and in accordance with any recommendations of the Iowa Department of Public Health, food and beverages may be sold if such food or beverages are promptly taken from the premises, such as on a carry-out or drive-through basis, or if the food or beverage is delivered to customers off the premises.

B. Fitness Center: All fitness centers, health clubs, health spas, gyms, aquatic centers are hereby closed.

C.   Theaters: All theaters or other performance venues at which live performances or or motion pictures are shown are hereby closed.

D.   Casinos and Gaming Facilities: All casinos and other facilities conducting pari-mutuel wagering or gaming operations are hereby closed.

E. Mass Gathering: Social, community, spiritual, religious, recreational, leisure, and sporting gatherings and events of more than 10 people are hereby prohibited at all locations and venues, including but not limited to parades, festivals, conventions, and fundraisers. Planned large gatherings and events must be canceled or postponed until after termination of this disaster.

F. Senior Citizen Centers and Adult Daycare Facilities:  All facilities that conduct adult day services or other senior citizen centers are hereby closed.

SECTION FOUR.  I hereby direct all state agencies to coordinate expeditiously in developing plans to mitigate the economic effects of the closings necessitated by this disaster, including potential financial support, regulatory relief, and other executive actions.

SECTION FIVE.  As required by Iowa Code § 29C.6 (1), (10) and 42 U.S.C. § 5170 in cases of Presidential Disaster Declarations, this Proclamation of Disaster Emergency continues to activate the disaster response and recovery aspects of the Iowa Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management’s Iowa Emergency Response Plan and those additional response plans applicable to the counties affected by this disaster and authorizes the use and deployment of all available state resources, supplies, equipment, and materials as are reasonably necessary to assist those citizens located in the disaster affected counties.

SECTION SIX.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I continue to temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of 11 Iowa Admin. Code § 53.11 (3) prohibiting pay to those State of Iowa employees for hours worked in excess of 40 hours per workweek while present in the State’s Emergency Operations Center or otherwise engaged in assigned disaster response missions or other activities. 

SECTION SEVEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (8) and (10), I continue to order all state agencies to utilize such personnel, equipment, and facilities as necessary to assist the Iowa Department of Public Health and the Iowa Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management in performing any and all activities necessary to prevent, contain, and mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 virus. 

SECTION EIGHT.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code §§ 135.61 through 135.73 requiring an institutional health facility to obtain a certificate of need prior to operating additional bed capacity. Suspension of these provisions is limited to the duration of this proclamation and is further limited to the provision of medical assistance and treatment of victims of this public health emergency. 

SECTION NINE.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 147.137 and Iowa Admin. Code rule 653-13.11, rule 641-155.2, and other implementing administrative rules establishing preconditions, limitations, or restrictions on the provision of telehealth or telemedicine services, and I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Admin. Code rules 641-155.21(19) and 155.23(4) and other administrative rules which require face-to-face interactions with health care providers and impose requirements for residential and outpatient substance use disorder treatment and for face-to-face visitations.

SECTION TEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 147.10 and Iowa Admin. Code rules 653-9.13(6) and 9.14, rules 655-3.7(5), rules 645-261.8, and rules 645-326.9(8), and all other implementing administrative rules which prohibit the practice of medicine and surgery, osteopathic medicine and surgery, nursing, respiratory care, and practice as a physician assistant, by a licensee whose license is inactive or lapsed.  Suspension of these provisions is limited to licenses which have lapsed or expired within the five (5) years prior to this Proclamation and is further limited to the provision of medical and nursing care and treatment of victims of this public health disaster emergency and solely for the duration of this Proclamation.

SECTION ELEVEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 256.16(1)(a)(2)(d) and (m) and Iowa Admin. Code rules 281-77.10 (9), 281-79.14(5), and 281-79.14(7), to the extent that they require a minimum number of hours of field experience if the higher education institution providing practitioner preparation program determines that the student has completed sufficient field experience to determine that the student should be recommended for licensure. 

SECTION TWELVE.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 321.196 prescribing that a driver’s license issued to a person age seventy-two or older expires after two years.  Suspension of this provision is limited to driver’s licenses which have expired within the 60 days prior to this Proclamation or during the duration of this Proclamation or any subsequent extension of this proclamation. And upon the expiration of the terms of this Proclamation or any subsequent extension of this proclamation, the statutory sixty-day period for renewing shall resume. This suspension shall not apply if the person is not eligible for a license due to the person’s license being suspended, revoked, denied or barred for any reason or if the person is physically or mentally incapable of operating a motor vehicle safely. 

SECTION THIRTEEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 321.174A prescribing that a person shall not operate a motor vehicle on the highways of this state with an expired driver’s license as applied to a person whose driver’s license is expired. Suspension of this provision is limited to driver’s licenses which have expired within the 60 days prior to this Proclamation or during the duration of this Proclamation or any subsequent extension of this proclamation. And upon the expiration of the terms of this Proclamation or any subsequent extension of this proclamation, the statutory sixty-day period for renewing shall resume.

SECTION FOURTEEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 321.39 prescribing expiration dates for vehicle registration, registration cards, and registration plates as applied to a person whose vehicle registration, registration card, or registration plate is expired.  Suspension of this provision is limited to vehicle registration, registration cards, and registration plates which have expired within the 60 days prior to this Proclamation or during the duration of this Proclamation or any subsequent extension of this proclamation.

SECTION FIFTEEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 321.46 prescribing a transferee of a new motor vehicle shall apply for a new registration and certificate of title within 30 days of the purchase.

SECTION SIXTEEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 321.25 prescribing a vehicle may be operated upon the highways of this state without registration plates for a period of 45 days after the date of delivery of the vehicle to the purchaser from a dealer.

SECTION SEVENTEEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code §29C.6 (6), I continue to temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code §§ 321.463 (6) (a) and (b) and 321E.29 and Iowa Admin. Code chapter 761-511, to the extent that those provisions restrict the movement of oversize and overweight loads of food, medical supplies, cleaning products, and other household goods, and require a permit to transport such loads.

A. Suspension of these provisions applies to loads transported on all highways within Iowa, excluding the interstate system, and those which do not exceed a maximum of 90,000 pounds gross weight, do not exceed the maximum axle weight limit determined under the non-primary highway maximum gross weight table in Iowa Code §321.463 (6) (b), by more than twelve and one-half percent (12.5%), do not exceed the legal maximum axle weight limit of 20,000 pounds, and comply with posted limits on roads and bridges.

B. This action is intended to allow vehicles transporting food, medical supplies, cleaning products, and other household goods to be oversize and overweight, not exceeding 90,000 pounds gross weight, without a permit, but only for the duration of this proclamation.

C. The Iowa Department of Transportation is hereby directed to monitor the operation of this proclamation to assure the public’s safety and facilitate the movement of trucks involved in transporting food and other household goods.

SECTION EIGHTEEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I continue to temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 455C.3 (1) and Iowa Admin. Code chapter 567-107, to the extent that those provisions require a dealer to accept an empty beverage container on which an Iowa deposit was made. This action is intended to allow retailers who engage in the sale of liquor, beer, wine, carbonated beverages, and other beverages on which an Iowa beverage container deposit is made to stop accepting empty beverage containers for the duration of this disaster emergency.

SECTION NINETEEN.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6) and 49 CFR § 390.23, I continue to temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code § 321.449 pertaining to hours of service of motor carriers and drivers of commercial motor vehicles, while transporting vaccines, antivirals, prescription drugs, protective equipment, and other necessary medical assets, subject to the following condition:

A.   Nothing contained in this Proclamation shall be construed as an exemption from the controlled substances and alcohol use and testing requirements set out in 49 CFR Part 382, the commercial drivers’ license requirements set out in 49 CFR Part 383, the financial responsibility requirements set out in 49 CFR Part 387, or any other portion of the Code of Federal Regulations not specifically identified in this Proclamation.

B. No motor carrier operating under the terms of this agreement shall require or allow a fatigued or ill driver to operate a motor vehicle.  A driver who informs a carrier that he or she needs immediate rest shall be given at least ten consecutive hours off duty before the driver is required to return to service.

 C. Upon the request of a driver, a commercial motor carrier operating under this proclamation must give the driver at least thirty-four (34) consecutive hours off when the driver has been on duty for more than seventy (70) hours during any eight (8) consecutive days.

D.   Motor carriers that have an out-of-service order in effect may not take advantage of the relief from regulations that this proclamation provides under title 49 CFR § 390.23.

E. Upon the expiration of this Proclamation, or when a driver has been relieved of all duty and responsibility to transport necessary medical assets under the conditions of this Proclamation, a driver who has had at least thirty-four (34) consecutive hours off duty shall be permitted to start the driver’s on-duty status hours with the 60/70 hour clock at zero.

F. This portion of this Proclamation of Disaster Emergency applies only to hours of service of motor carriers and drivers of commercial motor vehicles while actively transporting medical assets related to the COVID-19 event.

SECTION TWENTY.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 29C.6 (6), I continue to temporarily suspend the regulatory provisions of Iowa Code Chapter 8A, Iowa Code § 313.10, 11 Iowa Admin. Code Chapters 117 and 118, and 641 Iowa Admin. Code Chapter 176, requiring the Iowa Department of Public Health, the Iowa Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and other state agencies involved in the response to this disaster emergency to procure goods and services through a competitive selection process. Suspension of these provisions is limited to the duration of this proclamation and is further limited to procurements which are necessary to prevent, contain, or mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 virus. 

SECTION TWENTY-ONE.  The Iowa Department of Public Safety, the Iowa Department of Public Health, the Iowa Department of Education, the Iowa Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, the Iowa Department of Transportation and other participating state agencies are hereby directed to monitor the operation and implementation of this proclamation to assure the public’s health and safety.

SECTION TWENTY-TWO.  Nothing contained in this declaration shall be construed as an exemption from any other portion of the Iowa Code or Iowa Administrative Code not specifically identified in this proclamation.

SECTION TWENTY-THREE.  This state of disaster emergency shall be effective immediately on March 16, 2020 shall continue for thirty (30) days, and shall expire on April 16, 2020, at 11:59 p.m., unless sooner terminated or extended in writing by me. Iowa Code § 29C.6 (1).